Articles Posted in Gaming Law

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The West Virginia Racing Commission suspended the occupational permits of each of seven jockeys for thirty days and imposed a $1,000 fine on each of the jockeys for certain rules governing horse racing. The circuit court reversed and vacated the Commission’s order, finding that there was insufficient evidence to support the Commission’s factual findings. The Supreme Court reversed, holding (1) the fact that the circuit court’s review of the evidence resulted in the circuit court reaching an alternative conclusion based on substantial evidence was not a valid reason to reverse the Commission’s findings; and (2) the Commission’s findings of fact were supported by substantial evidence. View "W. Va. Racing Comm’n v. Reynolds" on Justia Law

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The West Virginia Racing Commission promulgated two administrative rules, a rule establishing the burden of proof for ejections by a racing association and a rule allowing the Racing Commission to grant a stay of a permit holder’s ejection by a racing association pending review. The Racing Commission adopted the rules without legislative approval, concluding that the rules were merely procedural rather than legislative and thus did not require legislative approval. PNGI Charles Town Gaming, LLC filed a petition seeking a writ of prohibition and declaratory judgment claiming that the rules had not been properly promulgated under the West Virginia Administrative Procedures Act. The circuit court entered summary judgment in favor of the Racing Decision, concluding that the rules were properly adopted without the need for legislative approval and that the Racing Commission possessed inherent authority to issue a stay of a racetrack’s ejection decision. The Supreme Court affirmed, holding that the circuit court did not err in concluding that the two rules were properly enacted procedural rules that were within the authority of the Racing Commission. View "PNGI Charles Town Gaming, LLC v. W. Va. Racing Comm’n" on Justia Law